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Cynthia Golomb, MD | Dermatology Boutique

In the News

Integrative Dermatology

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Integrative Medicine is now taking hold in the specialty of Dermatology.  If you haven’t heard of it, Integrative Medicine makes use of a wider variety of therapies, some ancient, some alternative, along with conventional medicine, to help patients heal.  The lifestyle and diet of patients are more closely examined and recommendations for changes are made to treat or prevent disease or symptoms.

For my field there are many interconnections between the gut and the skin.  For example, we know that weight lifters who use whey protein supplements can worsen their acne.  Dairy, or a high glycemic diet can also cause acne.

Recent studies have shown that the gut bacteria of patients with inflammatory skin diseases like acne or psoriasis is different—with less of the microbiota needed to control inflammation.  Introducing probiotics to the gut may have some effect on improving acne.  Probiotics may be considered a therapeutic option for acne, to provide a synergistic, anti-inflammatory effect when used in combination with oral antibiotics.

So what else can you do to improve your gut health?  Reduce stress!  Your whole body makes changes when it gets ready for “fight or flight.”  If you are under stress for a prolonged period, that’s when the unhealthy bacteria take over in the gut and cause inflammation, which in turn can be exhibited in your skin as acne, eczema or rosacea.

 

Join me online FEBRUARY 24 at 6:30pm

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Love fillers, but want a filler that looks even more natural and lasts longer?

Or, have you always wanted to try fillers but didn’t want to look “done?” This is the event for you!

You are invited to a very special Virtual Event highlighting my new, exclusive new line of fillers: The RHA Collection.  It’s a Swiss innovation, popular in Europe, now approved for use in the U.S. 

Join me online FEBRUARY 24 at 6:30pm

Register today at https://www.dermboutiqueevent.com/

The woman who developed RHA wanted to design a filler as close to the body’s natural hyaluronic acid as possible to achieve a soft, natural look.  RHA stands for “Resilient Hyaluronic Acid.”

What Makes RHA different from other fillers?

  • It is very smooth, with no lumps and bumps.
  • It integrates with the tissue for a very natural look.
  • Lasts longer than other fillers, up to 15 months.
  • Designed to perform in the most dynamic areas of the face without looking stiff or unnatural.

RHA is exclusive to experienced injectors and I am thrilled to be one of 15 medical practices in Broward County Florida selected to offer it.

At my Virtual Event, I will discuss and demonstrate this new line of fillers, answer your questions in a live chat Q&A and offer special pricing for event attendees ONLY!  We will have giveaways too.

Excited?? I am too! You’ll need to register today, so please don’t delay.

Register at https://www.dermboutiqueevent.com/

Natural Does Not Necessarily Mean Safe

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I’m a believer in science and clinical trials when deciding on what to recommend to patients for skincare and of course, pharmaceutical treatments.

But right now there’s a lot of money and social media influence spent on convincing you that some ingredients in skincare products are harmful.

What’s interesting is that the alternatives pushed by the clean beauty movement often result in skin irritation, infections or allergic reactions.

As you’ll see from this editorial in JAMA Dermatology, many useful and safe ingredients have been “demonized” without any scientific evidence.

Beware of marketing terms like “natural” and “clean” and look for clinical trials that demonstrate the results of the product and show the vast majority of testers did not have adverse reactions.

You can read the editorial from JAMA Dermatology here.

Viruses, Your Skin and Vaccines

· COVID-19, In the News · Comments Off on Viruses, Your Skin and Vaccines

Many viruses like herpes simplex, chicken pox, measles, and now COVID-19, have prominent cutaneous physical findings.

Measles is a virus that is on the rise again in the United States because of decreased adherence to vaccination programs. Measles is spread by respiratory droplets and has a long incubation period of 10-12 days. Fever, conjunctivitis and malaise begin before the rash.  The skin manifestations are red blotchy patches that typically start on the face around the ears, cheeks and neck then spread to involve the body.  One key feature is called Koplik’s spots — tiny blue white dots inside the mouth.

Erythema infectiosum (Fifth disease)

One of the easiest viral rashes to identify is Erythema Infectiosum (Fifth Disease).  It is caused by human parvovirus B19.  After about the 10th day of asymptomatic infection, there is a mild fever, malaise and headache.  The rash begins a few days later with a strikingly red raised patches over the cheeks (likened to slapped cheeks). It is followed by red patches over the buttocks, arms and legs.  Adults have more symptoms like fever and not feeling well.  When in doubt, antibody testing is very reliable.  IgM, the initial antibodies, help me to confirm the case and last only a few months.  Long term antibodies are the IgG and can last a lifetime.

Chicken Pox (Varicella) is caused by the same virus as Shingles (Herpes Zoster), a herpes virus (DNA virus) also spread by respiratory droplets.  Interestingly the incubation period can be as long as 23 days for chicken pox. Again fever and malaise for a few days followed by crops of blisters predominately on the face and scalp.  The rash is very itchy.  Chicken pox can cause lots of complications like encephalitis and varicella pneumonia.

The second stage of chicken pox typically presents in adulthood, although children can get it also. There is no convincing evidence that shingles can be contracted from another individual.  The virus is an opportunist and reactivates when an individual is immunosuppressed, or when a purely personal event allows the virus to resurrect.  Most of you are aware that shingles follows one side of the body and corresponds to a dermatome (skin surface along a nerve branch).  Shingles can be mild or extremely painful with complications like facial palsy, involvement of the eye and postherpetic long-lasting pain.

Herpes simplex, warts and molluscum contagiosum are other viral diseases of the skin.  There are numerous others.

Hives

The most recent health care crisis with COVID-19 has brought us a variety of skin presentations.  Reports are now storming the medical journals with skin rashes from COVID-19.  Early reports suggest about 20% of patients have skin findings including generalized hives, small bruise-like rashes, frostbite-like changes in the fingers and toes and a red lacelike rash known by dermatologists as “livedo reticularis.”

Livedo reticularis

Rashes start at the onset of COVID-19 symptoms or shortly thereafter. The rashes most commonly affect the trunk with itch that was mild or absent and resolved after a few days.  The earliest reports of frostbite or purple fingers and toes were most commonly seen in those who were critically ill.  Now, the dermatologic registry is expanding and most COVID toes are reported in younger patients, 20-30, who are recovering.

I have not encountered skin findings of COVID-19 as of yet with any of my patients.

I hope and pray that one of the good things that comes out of this crisis is that more and more people will realize the necessity of vaccination to prevent the spread of disease in the community.  More than ever, I have encountered parents who refuse to vaccinate their children because they believed propaganda that vaccines are pushed on us for big pharma to make profits.  Now there are concerns that vaccination rates are dropping further as more kids are missing vaccines due to the pandemic.

One of my earliest childhood memories is receiving the polio vaccine as a child with all of my family. A heartfelt thanks to Jonas Salk, the physician that ended the terror of polio by developing the polio vaccine released on April 12, 1955.  He was a viral expert recruited by my undergraduate alma mater, the University of Pittsburgh.  I attended pharmacy school classes in Salk Hall.

I have a very strong feeling about the importance of vaccination and I hope that this latest pandemic will help more people realize we need to vaccinate to prevent disease.

We’ve Moved!

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Information about getting to our new office

I’m excited to let you know that we’ve moved into our new location right next door to our former office.  Our new address is:

100 N Federal Hwy, Suite 202
Hallandale Beach, FL 33009

The new building is on the corner of US1 and NE 1st St (in between Flanigan’s and our old building).  It is a white 5-story with an “Accesso Partners” sign at the top of the south side. Directions via Google Maps.

Enter from the parking lot door and you’ll find a directory.  We are on the second floor in Suite 202.  There is an elevator.

Our phone numbers and email addresses remain the same.  Our office hours are:

Monday 1 pm – 5 pm
Tue, Wed, Fri 9 am – 5 pm
Thur Closed
Sat 9 am – 3 pm

Not only have we upgraded our facility, but we have also added new technology and skincare to address your skin challenges. 

  • I upgraded our radio frequency microneedling treatment to the Genius (it is more comfortable with quicker and better results than Infini.  And, less downtime!)
  • I’m now performing Mohs skin cancer surgery in the office several times a month.  Mohs is often done on the face to retain as much non-cancerous skin tissue as possible to reduce scarring.

Thank you for being a patient.  I appreciate your support of my practice.  It means so much to me.  I’m thrilled to continue to provide you with the best dermatologic services, now in a brand new venue.  I look forward to seeing you soon!

Paparazzi in Hollywood Florida

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Recently I attended the Florida Society of Dermatology and Dermatologic Surgery conference in Hollywood Florida.

I was nominated for best cosmetic dermatologist and you can see how we had to run from the paparazzi on the red carpet at the award ceremony event.

Seriously, Terri Cronin, FSDDS president, did an outstanding job of putting together great speakers this year. I am pictured (second from right) with (from l to r) Jacqueline Dosal MD, of Skin Associates, Keyvan Nouri MD, Mohs surgeon at the University of Miami and Terri Cronin MD.  Paparazzi at either end of our line up — unknown!

I stay up-to-date by attending medical conferences with world class faculty. I love learning new techniques that will help my patients.

Tarzan needs Kybella

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closeupWhen we expanded our office space we didn’t realize we’d acquire a mascot! Pictured is “Tarzan,” who from a quick web search appears to be an iguana.

No worries though, Tarzan is outside of the windows in our new “tree rooms.” He comes to say hello every morning.

If you don’t want your skin to look like Tarzan’s, book an appointment for an anti-aging treatment or a skin cancer check. widerangle

We think Tarzan could benefit from a few Kybella treatments to get rid of his double chin.

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